Wittgensteinians
Life in the Post-Analytic World, Given by the Man Who Ended Philosophy As History Knew It

Home » Concerning Wittgenstein's Ideas » Wittgenstein and Mathematics » Color Octahedron
Color Octahedron [message #3790] Wed, 10 March 2010 19:04 Go to next message
RetroDeathRow is currently offline  RetroDeathRow
Messages: 56
Registered: January 2010
Location: Texas
Member
In the Philosophical Remarks, W makes remarks on the Color Octahedron. But I see no explicit description of it (of course).

The only way I have considered its construction is by way of RGB+W and CYM+K, so that white is surrounded on edges by red and green and blue, and those press against cyan and yellow and magenta (though these three seem like they could be otherwise), and black is then opposite of white.

But then, W remarks that if someone thinks they can imagine a fourth dimension, why don't they reveal it in colors? (we already have three dimensional color space).

I was curious as to how colored tetrahedrons might stack up. Maybe white in one corner, the three primaries at the three other corners, and a continual succession... but now I think a construction would do better than guessed.

Compared to a cartesian system, which has three axis, a tetrahedron has four axis. Does this qualify as 'four dimensional space(-time)'?

How have others handled W's remarks on the color octahedron and the test of four-dimensional color space?


He had a wonderful life.

[Updated on: Fri, 09 July 2010 22:26] by Moderator

Report message to a moderator

Re: Color Octahedron [message #4981 is a reply to message #3790] Thu, 10 June 2010 14:11 Go to previous messageGo to next message
RetroDeathRow is currently offline  RetroDeathRow
Messages: 56
Registered: January 2010
Location: Texas
Member
"There are four primary colors"
-LW

Red, Yellow, Blue, and Green!

I am not sure ow this relates to an octahedron, but maybe the tetrahedron. I was shopping for a new tv with my girlfriend and one of the selling points was that some new tvs had yellow in addition to the three usual colors. And the picture was much more vibrant in color.

If a triangle can describe a circle, then a tetrahedron can describe a sphere. The thing is that the Cartesian 3D makes one think 3D is described by three axes. But we still do not leave i behind us, nor introduce constructable cubic roots. With 4 axes, that is exactly what happens.

It does not seem that this changes 3D color space, but obviously what we can do with color, generally. Oh, and maths.

thoughts?


He had a wonderful life.
Re: Color Octahedron [message #5024 is a reply to message #4981] Fri, 25 June 2010 13:40 Go to previous messageGo to next message
RetroDeathRow is currently offline  RetroDeathRow
Messages: 56
Registered: January 2010
Location: Texas
Member
Is the Philosophical Remarks out of order?

I am reading the last section before the appendices and a picture of the color octahedron is presented. That is, on page 256 I can see what W has spoken of on and off-hand for the last hundred pages if not more. Sure, the TLP doesn't have truth tables until the end of that work, but it is only 50-odd pages, not 300.

The editors remark that part 1 was written on the right hand side of a notebook, part 2 the left (and dates signified to the editors how to publish the material--though it is all a bit complicated). Numbers were added by the editors, not W.

The editors remark on how the PR sense is grasped after a few reads. Sure, the TLP lends itself to re-reading (in a different order) upon completion, but this case is a bit different. I'll have to re-read it at some future junction, but a tip to those embarking on reading the Philosophical Remarks--check out page 256!

Maybe the book is in order but the fact that there are no primers for this book the greatest hurdle to overcome. Even poor primers (like Russell's intro to the TLP) say something.

I speculated at the 4-primary-colors as a tetrahedron, being RGB + White. Then, in seeing what new 4-color televisions use, the obvious jump was RGB + Yellow... and maybe that could do 3D color space. But that was not the case-- the octahedron has 6 points and "names resemble point", of course. The 6 points correspond to the four primary colors (Red, Green, Blue, Yellow) and Black & White on opposite corners.

I do hope Kirby has something cool to say about Octohedrons. Geometry is not my specialty.

...

It took a year after the fact for the TLP to be clear; and maybe that long for the PI to take some shape for me; I guess I shouldn't expect anything different here and just read every day.


He had a wonderful life.
Re: Color Octahedron [message #5039 is a reply to message #5024] Sun, 27 June 2010 18:46 Go to previous messageGo to next message
RetroDeathRow is currently offline  RetroDeathRow
Messages: 56
Registered: January 2010
Location: Texas
Member
Edit: In regards to the Color Octahedron: The page was 278 and not 256. (at least, I hope I recalled it correctly now; and it is not the last section, but close.)

He had a wonderful life.
Re: Color Octahedron [message #5091 is a reply to message #5039] Sat, 03 July 2010 14:46 Go to previous messageGo to next message
RetroDeathRow is currently offline  RetroDeathRow
Messages: 56
Registered: January 2010
Location: Texas
Member
I just realized that the color octahedron is in some respects a lot like Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus 5.101

Curious. Would this then be an application of the TLP's 'Philosopy'?


He had a wonderful life.
Re: Color Octahedron [message #6851 is a reply to message #5091] Thu, 04 August 2011 23:25 Go to previous message
jianjian is currently offline  jianjian
Messages: 1
Registered: August 2011
Junior Member
RetroDeathRow wrote on Sat, 03 July 2010 14:46
I just realized that the color octahedron is in some respects a lot like Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus 5.101

Curious. Would this then be an application of the TLP's 'Philosopy'?

Previous Topic: [Wittrs] Re: Readings in Martian Math (2010.8.26)
Goto Forum:
  


Current Time: Sun Feb 25 20:47:56 EST 2018

Total time taken to generate the page: 0.01491 seconds